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Actor Robin Williams Found Dead In California Home

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(Photo by Ben Gabbe/Getty Images)

(Photo by Ben Gabbe/Getty Images)

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PITTSBURGH (KDKA/AP) – Robin Williams, a brilliant shapeshifter who could channel his frenetic energy into delightful comic characters like “Mrs. Doubtfire” or harness it into richly nuanced work like his Oscar-winning turn in “Good Will Hunting,” died Monday in an apparent suicide. He was 63.

Williams was pronounced dead at his San Francisco Bay Area home Monday, according to the sheriff’s office in Marin County, north of San Francisco. The sheriff’s office said the preliminary investigation shows the cause of death to be a suicide due to asphyxia.

Thursday Williams’ wife said he was in the stages of Parkinson’s disease and was sober at the time of his apparent suicide.

In a statement Thursday, Susan Schneider said that Williams was struggling with depression, anxiety and the early stages of Parkinson’s when he was found dead earlier this week..

The wife of the actor-comedian said he was not ready to share his Parkinson’s diagnosis publicly.

One of Robin Williams most iconic roles was portraying United States Air Force sergeant and disc jockey Adrian Cronauer in the film Good Morning Vietnam.

Cronauer is from Pittsburgh and now lives in SW Virginia.

Cronauer talked with Bill Rehkopf on the KDKA Afternoon News about his experiences and his memories of Williams.

“The British have a term is called gobsmacked,” Cronauer told NewsRadio 1020 KDKA, “I had a friend in Honolulu call me and she was very upset, she had just gotten the word and, she said have you heard? I said no what? So she told me and I was gobsmacked, I really was.”

Cronauer came up with the concept for the 1987 comedy about the war, which shocked everyone they could twist the events that occurred into the comedy genre. A lot of people do not realize how much the original idea was adapted before reaching the final product.

“I did a treatment for a TV sitcom I called Good Morning Vietnam but, nobody believed you could do a comedy about Vietnam. So a couple of years later I was still thinking in terms of television, I redid it as an idea for a movie of the week. This time a friends agent got it into Robin Williams hands and he read it and said ‘oh disc jockey a chance to do my comic shtick lets do it but only lets do it as a real movie-movie’,” Cronauer said.

Here more of his interview here:

Remembering Robin Williams

robin williams Actor Robin Williams Found Dead In California Home
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Cronauer told KDKA’s Ralph Iannotti, “I went out to Hollywood and spent a week there, telling them everything I could remember happening in Vietnam. They’d say things like, oh that’s a great incident, we’ll have to use that in the movie, of course we’ll have to change it totally.”

He says producers took the liberty of changing the script at least five-times.

He was shocked to hear of Williams’ untimely death.

After the movie was finished, Cronauer said he finally met Williams at the movie premiere in 1987.

“He shook my hand and he said I’m glad to finally meet you, and I said well I’m glad to finally meet me too, and we got along fine after that.”

Cronauer was also invited to one of Williams’ birthday parties and said he got to know a different side of the actor, someone who adored his children, and liked to spend a lot of time with them.

Robin Williams was in the Pittsburgh area in 2007. He was the surprise after dinner guest at a birthday party for billionaire Joe Hardy. Williams was one of 500 guests for Hardy’s 84th birthday celebration.

KDKA’s Pittsburgh Today Live had the chance to catch up with Robin Williams when he joined the show to talk about the premiere of “The Crazy Ones.”

KDKA’s Kristine Sorensen spoke with Robin Williams about the show, and you see that interview here.

The Marin County coroner’s office said Williams was last seen alive at home at about 10 p.m. Sunday. An emergency call from his house in Tiburon was placed to the Sheriff’s Department shortly before noon Monday.

“This morning, I lost my husband and my best friend, while the world lost one of its most beloved artists and beautiful human beings. I am utterly heartbroken,” said Williams’ wife, Susan Schneider. “On behalf of Robin’s family, we are asking for privacy during our time of profound grief. As he is remembered, it is our hope the focus will not be on Robin’s death, but on the countless moments of joy and laughter he gave to millions.”

Williams had been battling severe depression recently, said Mara Buxbaum, his press representative. Just last month, he announced he was returning to a 12-step treatment program he said he needed after 18 months of nonstop work. He had sought treatment in 2006 after a relapse following 20 years of sobriety.

From his breakthrough in the late 1970s as the alien in the hit TV show “Mork & Mindy,” through his standup act and such films as “Good Morning, Vietnam,” the short, barrel-chested Williams ranted and shouted as if just sprung from solitary confinement. Loud, fast and manic, he parodied everyone from John Wayne to Keith Richards, impersonating a Russian immigrant as easily as a pack of Nazi attack dogs.

He was a riot in drag in “Mrs. Doubtfire,” or as a cartoon genie in “Aladdin.” He won his Academy Award in a rare dramatic role, as an empathetic therapist in the 1997 film “Good Will Hunting.”

He was no less on fire in interviews. During a 1989 chat with The Associated Press, he could barely stay seated in his hotel room, or even mention the film he was supposed to promote, as he free-associated about comedy and the cosmos.

“There’s an Ice Age coming,” he said. “But the good news is there’ll be daiquiris for everyone and the Ice Capades will be everywhere. The lobster will keep for at least 100 years, that’s the good news. The Swanson dinners will last a whole millennium. The bad news is the house will basically be in Arkansas.”

As word of his death spread, tributes from inside and outside the entertainment industry poured in.

“Robin Williams was an airman, a doctor, a genie, a nanny, a president, a professor, a bangarang Peter Pan, and everything in between. But he was one of a kind. He arrived in our lives as an alien – but he ended up touching every element of the human spirit. He made us laugh. He made us cry. He gave his immeasurable talent freely and generously to those who needed it most – from our troops stationed abroad to the marginalized on our own streets,” President Barack Obama said in a statement.

Following Williams on stage, Billy Crystal once observed, was like trying to top the Civil War. In a 1993 interview with the AP, Williams recalled an appearance early in his career on “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson.” Bob Hope was also there.

“It was interesting,” Williams said. “He was supposed to go on before me and I was supposed to follow him, and I had to go on before him because he was late. I don’t think that made him happy. I don’t think he was angry, but I don’t think he was pleased.

“I had been on the road and I came out, you know, gassed, and I killed and had a great time. Hope comes out and Johnny leans over and says, ‘Robin Williams, isn’t he funny?’ Hope says, ‘Yeah, he’s wild. But you know, Johnny, it’s great to be back here with you.'”

In 1992, Carson chose Williams and Bette Midler as his final guests.

Like so many funnymen, Williams had dramatic ambitions. He played for tears in “Awakenings,” ”Dead Poets Society” and “What Dreams May Come,” which led New York Times critic Stephen Holden to write that he dreaded seeing the actor’s “Humpty Dumpty grin and crinkly moist eyes.”

But other critics approved, and Williams won three Golden Globes, for “Good Morning, Vietnam,” ”Mrs. Doubtfire” and “The Fisher King.”

His other film credits included Robert Altman’s “Popeye” (a box office bomb), Paul Mazursky’s “Moscow on the Hudson,” Steven Spielberg’s “Hook” and Woody Allen’s “Deconstructing Harry.” On stage, Williams joined fellow comedian Steve Martin in a 1988 Broadway revival of “Waiting for Godot.”

“Robin was a lightning storm of comic genius and our laughter was the thunder that sustained him. He was a pal and I can’t believe he’s gone,” Spielberg said.

More recently, he appeared in the “Night at the Museum” movies, playing President Theodore Roosevelt in the comedies in which Ben Stiller’s security guard has to contend with wax figures that come alive and wreak havoc after a museum closes. The third film in the series is in post-production, according to the Internet Movie Database.

In April, Fox 2000 said it was developing a sequel to “Mrs. Doubtfire” and Williams was in talks to join the production.

Williams also made a short-lived return to TV last fall in CBS’ “The Crazy Ones,” a sitcom about a father-daughter ad agency team that co-starred Sarah Michelle Gellar. It was canceled after one season.

“I dread the word ‘art,'” Williams said in 1989 when discussing his craft with the AP. “That’s what we used to do every night before we’d go on with ‘Waiting for Godot.’ We’d go, ‘No art. Art dies tonight.’ We’d try to give it a life, instead of making “Godot” so serious. It’s cosmic vaudeville staged by the Marquis de Sade.”

His personal life was often short on laughter. He had acknowledged drug and alcohol problems in the 1970s and ’80s and was among the last to see John Belushi before the “Saturday Night Live” star died of a drug overdose in 1982.

Williams announced in 2006 that he was drinking again but rebounded well enough to joke about it during his recent tour. “I went to rehab in wine country,” he said, “to keep my options open.” The following year, he told the AP that people were surprised he was no longer clean.

“I fell off the wagon after 20 years and people are like, ‘Really?’ Well, yeah. It only kicks in when you really want to change,” he said.

Born in Chicago in 1951, Williams would remember himself as a shy kid who got some early laughs from his mother – by mimicking his grandmother. He opened up more in high school when he joined the drama club, and he was accepted into the Juilliard Academy, where he had several classes in which he and Christopher Reeve were the only students and John Houseman was the teacher.

Encouraged by Houseman to pursue comedy, Williams identified with the wildest and angriest of performers: Jonathan Winters, Lenny Bruce, Richard Pryor, George Carlin. Their acts were not warm and lovable. They were just being themselves.

“You look at the world and see how scary it can be sometimes and still try to deal with the fear,” he said in 1989. “Comedy can deal with the fear and still not paralyze you or tell you that it’s going away. You say, OK, you got certain choices here, you can laugh at them and then once you’ve laughed at them and you have expunged the demon, now you can deal with them. That’s what I do when I do my act.”

He unveiled Mork, the alien from the planet Ork, in an appearance on “Happy Days” and was granted his own series, which ran from 1978 to 1982 and co-starred Pam Dawber as a woman who takes in the interplanetary visitor.

“I am completely and totally devastated,” Dawber said in a statement. “What more can be said?”

Following his success in films, Williams often returned to television – for appearances on “Saturday Night Live,” for “Friends,” for comedy specials, for “American Idol,” where in 2008 he pretended to be a “Russian idol” who belts out a tuneless, indecipherable “My Way.”

Williams could handle a script, when he felt like it, and also think on his feet. He ad-libbed in many of his films and was just as quick in person. During a media tour for “Awakenings,” when director Penny Marshall mistakenly described the film as being set in a “menstrual hospital,” instead of “mental hospital,” Williams quickly stepped in and joked, “It’s a period piece.”

Winner of a Grammy in 2003 for best spoken comedy album, “Robin Williams – Live 2002,” he once likened his act to the daily jogs he took across the Golden Gate Bridge. There were times he would look over the edge, one side of him pulling back in fear, the other insisting he could fly.

“You have an internal critic, an internal drive that says, ‘OK, you can do more.’ Maybe that’s what keeps you going,” Williams said. “Maybe that’s a demon. … Some people say, ‘It’s a muse.’ No, it’s not a muse! It’s a demon! DO IT YOU BASTARD!! HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!! THE LITTLE DEMON!!”

In addition to his wife, Williams is survived by his three children: daughter Zelda, 25; and sons Zachary, 31, and Cody, 19.

CBS News Correspondent Steve Futterman joined “The KDKA Morning News” with Larry Richert and John Shumway from Marin County, Calif., just outside of San Francisco.

Futterman said that authority he has talked to told him it was a suicide, but right now they are saying it is “an apparent suicide, but that’s what [authorities] have to say.”

CBS News’ Steve Futterman

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