Body Works: New Exhibit Opens At Carnegie Science Center

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — A new exhibit is opening at the Carnegie Science Center.

“It’s called Body Works, and it focuses on all the basic systems of the human body. Muscles, skeletons, blood, guts, all that kind of stuff,” explains Dennis Bateman, CSC Director of Exhibits.

More than a year of work went into the project in conjunction with the Allegheny Health Network and other medical advisers.

“It’s something that we know works in elementary schools, middle schools, high schools, colleges. It’s a science topic, and it’s also very close to Pittsburgh, with all the medical research and medical facilities we have here,” says Bateman. “When their stomach is upset, when they have a headache, when they break an arm, you want them to have a better understanding of what’s happened.”

“As some of you may know, I’m getting a Masters in Public Health, and as part of that, I did an internship here at the Carnegie Science Center, specifically in this department,” says KDKA-TV News Health Editor, Dr. Maria Simbra.  “I helped with a new show about epidemics, and I helped with the text panels for the new floor exhibit. For example, let’s take a look at this one. Have you ever wondered what you look like inside? Well, here’s what I look like inside.”

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Besides your internal organs, you can check out your skeleton and muscles, see how your brain, learn about heart beats, and other sounds.

“If you like video games we have that. If you like actual specimens, we have that. If you like analogies and mechanics, we can explain your body that way,” says Bateman.

“I like how you can scan and see what the baby looks like,” says a third grader.

“I like how they’re all hands on activities,” says a fifth grader.

But the fan favorite? The fart stools.

The new exhibit opens to the public on October 15th, and will be updated as science advances.

“It has everything from a Victorian woman’s wooden leg to a 3D printed hand,” says Bateman. “That’s something that a year ago we wouldn’t have had.”

More from Dr. Maria Simbra

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