By Jon Delano

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PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Supporters gathered in the Court House park to root on their Republican candidate for governor, Pittsburgh attorney Laura Ellsworth, as polls show her picking up steam.

“We are so excited. We are feeling the momentum. We are feeling the growth of the numbers. Everybody we talk to is so excited about this. We know this is going to come down to the wire on Tuesday,” Ellsworth told KDKA political editor Jon Delano on Friday.

Ellsworth is one of three Republican candidates on the ballot, running against two men – PA. Sen. Scott Wagner of York and Pittsburgh business consultant Paul Mango, who each have spent millions on television trashing each other.

laura ellsworth Polls Show GOP Gubernatorial Candidate Laura Ellsworth Picking Up Steam

(Photo Credit: KDKA)

Former Allegheny County Executive Jim Roddey thinks Ellsworth has a shot in the year of the woman.

“It’s an outside shot, obviously, because she has not been able to advertise and match her opponents on TV,” said Roddey. “But maybe that’s a good thing. The opponents have been so divisive and their campaigns both have been ugly.”

With Mango and Wagner calling each other liars and dead-beats, Roddey thinks many Republicans may opt for Ellsworth.

“They want somebody who is an outsider, who will get things done, who will listen and who believes in a civil decent approach to the world,” noted Ellsworth.

Ellsworth claims she is the best candidate to defeat Governor Tom Wolf come November, but the real question is will enough Republican voters know her and feel the same way to cast their vote for her next Tuesday?

Most voters were just like this one.

Delano: “Have you ever heard of Scott Wagner?”
Voter: “I have not.”
Delano: “Have you ever heard of Paul Mango?”
Voter: “I have not.”
Delano: “Have you ever heard of Laura Ellsworth?”
Voter: “Oh my god, no.”

A Susquehanna Poll has Wagner at 37 percent, Mango at 23, and Ellsworth at 18 — she’s up 16 points from a month ago.

But a whopping 22 percent are still undecided.

“We think those undecideds are going to make the difference and break our way, and we think we win this race on Tuesday,” says Ellsworth.

Voters will decide on May 15.