PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — There are new developments in the search for a missing Whitehall woman.

Elizabeth Wiesenfeld failed to show up for work on April 30. Investigators went to her Whitehall home on East Barlind Street.

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When investigators went to open the storm door at the front of the home, it was unlocked. Wiesenfeld’s daughter said she always kept it locked.

Once everyone got inside, the home was a mess. The dog wasn’t contained in the spare bedroom. Instead, the dog was running around loose inside the home.

Elizabeth Wiesenfeld (Photos Courtesy: Allegheny County Police)

The rug in Wiesenfeld’s bedroom was out of place, and her closet door was open. Her purple glasses were found behind the door, and her prescription medications were found on the night stand.

Wiesendfeld’s wallet, wristlet and iPhone were missing. Cigarette ashes were found next to the bed, even though she didn’t smoke.

Wiesenfeld’s daughter told investigators it looked like her mother had been in the process of getting ready for work since her makeup bag and mirror were sitting out.

Wiesenfeld’s daughter told investigators she received a text that morning said: “I met someone. We’re leaving now for about a week. Look after everything at the house please. I’m going to have a good time for once.”

However, Weisenfeld’s suitcases were at the home. Wiesenfeld’s security system was also off, which was odd since her daughter said her mother has it on when she’s not home.

Family members told police Wiesenfeld used handyman Doug Berry in the past, but stopped using him because she was afraid of him. In October of last year, Berry showed up to her house unannounced.

Watch part 2 of Amy Wadas’ report —

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The morning Wiesenfeld went missing, Berry’s Ford truck was seen several times near her house, according to the warrants. Investigators tracked Wiesenfeld’s cell phone and found that it was in the same area as Berry’s truck. At one point, her phone was tracked in the South Side.

On May 1, detectives served a search warrant on Berry’s black Ford F-150 and a separate warrant for his home in Liberty Borough.

In the entryway, police spotted a blue hooded jacket hanging on a hook on the wall. The jacket had distinctive white paint markings on the right side front and a large zipper pull tab. A person wearing a similar jacket was spotted in a still photo at the PNC Bank ATM on Brownsville Road the day before. That’s when police believe Wiesenfeld’s Dollar Bank debit card was being used.

Berry’s wife was home when detectives served the search warrant. She told detectives Berry’s Ford F-150 was parked in front of the house, and he was driving her Ford Expedition. She told police he had been using the Expedition the last few days.

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On May 2, detectives conducted a secondary search at Wiesenfeld’s house. During the search, they spotted three cigarette butts outside the home. Butts were also collected from the landscaped area between Wiesenfeld’s driveway and the neighbor’s house and were described as one tan “Pall Mall” brand butt with white spots and one tan unbranded butt with white spots.

Detectives verified that the neighbors don’t smoke.

That same day, detectives processed both vehicles. They say the rear passenger seat of the Ford F-150 was stained, and a towel was found in the bed of the truck. Investigators used a chemical to reveal blood stains that have been washed out and wiped off on the suspect’s vehicle, and the steering wheel cover lit up.

Detectives also found an empty “Pall Mall” brand cigarette pack on the passenger side floor, and the same brand cigarette on the dashboard.

A knit ski mask was also recovered from the pocket of the rear driver’s seat.

Police also found a “Pall Mall” cigarette butt in the ashtray of the Ford Expedition, along with numerous other cigarette butts.

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After serving the search warrants, detectives determined they needed to collect Berry’s DNA.