By Andy Sheehan


MONROEVILLE, Pa. (KDKA) — Petland’s corporate office says it has launched an internal investigation into the death of a dog sold from a Monroeville store.

On Tuesday, KDKA reported on the story of a local family that is accusing Petland Monroeville of knowingly selling them a sick dog that later died.

(Photo Credit: KDKA)

Lindsay Kunkle says Petland knew their 16-week-old Siberian Husky named Shelby was sick.

KDKA’s Andy Sheehan talked to another owner with a similar story.

These days, Dobbie is a healthy and active Boston Terrier but that wasn’t always the case.

When his owner, Troy Grossi, bought him a year ago from the Robinson Petland, he says the dog barely weighed three pounds and was gravely ill.

Grossi took the dog to his local vet, where he says Dobbie was quarantined for three days and received intensive medical attention.

“Our vet told us flat out that if we hadn’t brought him in as soon as we did, which was only a few days, he would have died,” Grossi said.

Dobbie survived but in addition to the dog’s $4,000 purchase price, Grossi was suddenly saddled with more than $5,000 in vet bills.

(Photo Credit: KDKA)

He’s now just one of 10 dog owners who have filed complaints against Petland Robinson with the Better Business Bureau, which in turn has given the store an F-rating for not answering those complaints.

Like Grossi, several owners allege Petland knowingly sold them sick dogs and failed to compensate or help them afterward.

SHEEHAN: You believe they knowingly sold you a sick dog?

KUNKLE: Absolutely.

The Monroeville and Robinson stores are individually owned franchise and both stores have declined to comment.

But today in a statement, Petland’s corporate headquarters in Ohio said it will investigate Shelby’s death.

“Petland was just made aware of this unfortunate situation and has begun an internal investigation. The facts related to the care of the puppy are being gathered and a necropsy has been ordered. Once the results of the necropsy are available, Petland will take appropriate action.”

When purchasing an animal from Petland, the owner signs and enters into tightly prescribed, no-refund contract, which prohibits owners like Grossi from seeking their own veterinary care.

SHEEHAN: So when you said I’ve incurred $5,000 in vet bills what did Petland say?
GROSSI: They’re not responsible for it because we didn’t use their vets.

And the Better Business Bureau urges potential customers to study these contracts.

“If you’re not comfortable with these limitations, don’t make the purchase and don’t sign the contract,” said the BBB’s Warren King.