PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Twelve incumbent lawmakers in this region face primary opposition in their own parties in next Tuesday’s election.

As KDKA political editor Jon Delano reports, one of them has a very familiar name.

Adam Ravenstahl was elected state representative when his brother Luke was mayor, but long after Luke was gone, Adam’s been re-elected and re-elected.

Now, he faces a democratic challenger in Attorney Emily Kinkead who says it’s time for change.

“We need people in Harrisburg who are going to be champions for our district, and I believe District 20 has been stagnant for the time that Adam has been in office,” said Kinkead.

Kinkead accuses Ravenstahl of just holding the seat and never even speaking on the House floor.
“Everything I have looked up and seen, the research I have done, has shown that he has never spoken on the Floor,” said Kinkead.

“That’s absolutely inaccurate. I will tell you right now that I’m not the loudest person in the room, and I don’t think you have to be to get results, especially in Harrisburg,” said Ravenstahl.

Ravenstahl says his service is why local officials support him.

“They see me getting results. They see the experience I have in Harrisburg, the ability our office has to solve problems,” said Ravenstahl.

While both democrats share views on many issues, fracking and the Shell Cracker Plant is not one of them.

When asked if she would shut down the petrochemical plant being constructed in Beaver, Kinkead said “I would. I think Allegheny County is perfectly poised to be at the forefront of a green economy.”

When Ravenstahl was asked the same question, he said “No, no, I would not. I think it can be done in a safe way.”

This race is heated.

Ravenstahl accuses Kinkead of hypocrisy for taking a $52,000 contribution from the Service Employees Union while calling for campaign reform. Kinkead questions Ravenstahl for switching from pro-life to pro-choice just a few years ago.