Veterans Day looked different this year because of coronavirus, but that didn't stop Pittsburghers from honoring those who have served.By Paul Martino

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – Pittsburgh is known for its huge Veterans Day parade to honor those who served, but with COVID-19 this year, several smaller tributes were held in the area.

On this rainy Nov. 11, communities across the Pittsburgh area took time to honor all who have served.

In Oakland, flags line the front lawn of the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall and Museum, paying tribute to veterans.

At sunset, luminaries will be placed near the flags for another tribute.

At the Southwestern Pennsylvania World War II Memorial on the North Shore this morning, bicyclists prepared for a 20-mile trip that would stop at three more memorials.

(Photo Credit: KDKA Photojournalist Aaron Sledge)

Funds raised from the tour are going to support Pittsburgh Hires Veterans.

In Shaler Township, police said veterans came together to remember those who have served.

“Rain or Shine, at the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month, the Veterans from Shaler Township and our surrounding communities come together to remember all of the brave souls that have served our Country and made the ultimate sacrifice,” the department wrote on Facebook.

On the steps of St. Joseph’s church in Bloomfield, there was a solemn service. Many veterans received the blessing and remembered the pain of combat.

“You see their faces. The young kids. It’s just terrible,” said Vietnam vet Robert Miller.

(Photo Credit: KDKA)

As a young man, Miller of Lawrenceville took part in a deadly landing at Khe Shan. He’ll never forget it.

“Lost a lot of men,” he sad.

More than 50 years later, he’s still amazed that he got out alive.

“You have to stay alive. They were sent in as children. I have grandchildren at that age now.”

A less somber and more fun-filled event was held at Veterans Place on the East End. Veterans Place seeks and cares for homeless vets.

It was a day of recreation for veterans suffering from addiction, mental health issues and PTSD. A comfort horse was part of the fun.

“We really like to make today about them — opportunities to win prizes and gifts. There’s lunch provided. All types of activities for them,” said Veterans Place director Rob Hamilton.

Hamilton is so dedicated, he took several cold splashes in a dunk tank.

Western Pennsylvania has more than its share of veterans. The Census Bureau estimates more than 840,000 veterans live in Pennsylvania.