Question 1 Answer: all of the above are important factors in lowering your risk of heart disease.

Heart disease affects millions of Americans, but many people don’t fully understand their risks or the basic steps they can take to lower them. Your doctor can help you understand your risks, and help you figure out the best plan for lowering your risks based on your family history, medical history, and lifestyle.

Question 2 Answer: it depends.

Heart palpitations, or the feeling that your heart is pounding, fluttering, or skipping a beat, can be caused by many things—including stress, anxiety, and too much caffeine.

Heart palpitations can also be caused by serious heart problems, like heart failure, an abnormal heart rhythm, a heart valve problem, or a low level of oxygen in your blood—which can lead to a heart attack or other serious condition like stroke. Your doctor can help identify what is causing your heart palpitations and what you can do to manage your symptoms.

Question 3 Answer: B, animal-based foods.

Cholesterol is a soft, waxy substance that’s made naturally by your liver and present in all of your body’s cells. Cholesterol is found in some of the foods we eat; foods from animals, like meat, fish, poultry, egg yolks, and dairy products contain cholesterol, but foods from plants, like vegetables, fruits, nuts, and grains, do not.

Your cholesterol level is a measure of the amount of cholesterol in your blood. Ideal total cholesterol is 200 or lower, and it’s important for you to have your levels checked by your doctor to determine whether you’re at risk for heart disease. Too much cholesterol can cause a buildup of plaque in your arteries and lead to a blockage, which can cause a heart attack.

Contact your doctor to get your cholesterol checked, or find an upcoming heart screening by visiting www.upmc.com/checkyourheart.

Question 4 Answer: A, 120/80.

Every time your heart beats, it pumps blood out into your body. Your blood pressure is a measure of how hard your blood pushes against the walls of your arteries during circulation. Blood pressure is considered to be normal if it is 120/80 most of the time.

High blood pressure means that your blood is pushing too hard against the walls of your arteries. Over time, high blood pressure can weaken your heart, your blood vessels, and your kidneys and cause damage to other parts of your body.

Because high blood pressure has no symptoms, it’s important to get yours checked regularly. Talk to your doctor or visit www.upmc.com/checkyourheart to find an upcoming heart screening event near you.

Question 5 Answer: D, all of the above.

Men and women can have the same symptoms during a heart attack, but heart attack symptoms are not necessarily the same for everyone.

Men tend to have “classic” heart attack symptoms, like chest pain, arm pain, and shortness of breath.

Women can also have these symptoms, but many women have symptoms that aren’t as dramatic—like pain or pressure in the chest that comes and goes, sweating, nausea, dizziness or light-headedness, and pain in the jaw, arm, or back.

If you think you or someone else may be having a heart attack, call 9-1-1 right away. Early treatment can save your life.

Question 6 Answer: False.

Heart murmurs can affect children and adults, and there are two types, innocent and abnormal.

An “innocent” heart murmur often happens in healthy kids, and is not caused by an underlying heart problem.

An “abnormal” heart murmur is often caused by a congenital heart defects in children, and by a heart valve disease in adults. It’s important to talk to your doctor about your diagnosis (or your child’s diagnosis) to understand whether your heart murmur needs to be treated, and what type of treatment is best.

Question 7 Answer: C, another name for a heartbeat that is too fast, too slow, or irregular.

Your heart is a pump that works 24/7, keeping blood moving throughout your body. Most of the time, your heartbeat should be even and steady. It’s normal for your heart to beat faster when you exercise, or if you’re nervous, stressed, or afraid. But if your heart is racing when you’re perfectly calm and still, you might have a heart problem that needs treatment.

Atrial fibrillation, also called AFib, is a common cause of a fast or irregular heartbeat. It happens when the top two chambers of your heart quiver instead of beating normally, throwing off your heart’s rhythm. While AFib isn’t usually life-threatening on its own, it can lead to serious and potentially deadly conditions like stroke.

Other heart problems can also cause a fast or irregular heartbeat, like heart disease, heart valve problems, and a low level of oxygen in your blood. It’s important to talk to your doctor if you feel like your heart isn’t beating normally.

Question 8 Answer: True.

Smoking affects more than just your lungs—it affects your whole body, and is a major risk factor for heart disease.

The chemicals in tobacco damage your blood, your heart, and your blood vessels and increases your risk of developing a condition called atherosclerosis. This condition is also known as hardening of the arteries, and it happens when plaque builds up on your artery walls, causing them to become narrow or even completely blocked, which can lead to a heart attack or stroke.

If you’re a smoker, talk to your doctor about your options for quitting.

Question 9 Answer: A, 200 or lower

Cholesterol is a soft, waxy substance that’s made naturally by your liver and present in all of your body’s cells. Cholesterol is found in some of the foods we eat; foods from animals, like meat, fish, poultry, egg yolks, and dairy products contain cholesterol, but foods from plants, like vegetables, fruits, nuts, and grains, do not.

Your cholesterol level is a measure of the amount of cholesterol in your blood. Ideal total cholesterol is 200 or lower, and it’s important for you to have your levels checked by your doctor to determine whether you’re at risk for heart disease. Too much cholesterol can cause a buildup of plaque in your arteries and lead to a blockage, which can cause a heart attack.