By Jon Delano


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PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — With a bit of fanfare, Whole Foods now owned by Amazon says it will lower prices on hundreds of items, especially its produce and organic products.

“They’re feeling pressure from Aldi because Aldi is really well-known for its produce for their inexpensive fruits and vegetables,” said Professor Elaine Luther at Point Park University

The business professor says every grocery chain is fighting for customers, and Whole Foods is no exception.

“It’s almost like a market share fight, and the big one they’re fighting with is Walmart,” notes Luther. “And what they’re trying to do is have more people come to their Whole Foods stores.”

There’s a special push for customers, especially Amazon Prime members, to buy at Whole Foods.

For Prime members, there’s an additional ten percent reduction in their bill and some other specials that rotate weekly like organic asparagus at $2.99/lb (save $2), organic strawberries at $2.99/lb (save $2), whole no antibiotics chicken at $1.79/lb (save 40%) and fresh wild-caught halibut at $16.99/lb (save 35%), overall, a twenty percent cut in prices.

“I think that kind of competition is a good thing for everybody because I think these are quality stores,” said Marti Donovan, a Whole Foods customer from Bradford Woods.

Since Amazon’s acquisition of Whole Foods back in 2017, there seems to be a calculated effort to reshape the image of Whole Foods not as a super, high-priced “whole paycheck” store, but rather as one that can compete with others in the area.

Some people don’t think that effort is working.

“No I have not [seen price reductions]. No. Price reductions you can see a little bit in the fruit, vegetables,” said Whole Foods shopper Rita Sessoms of Center Township.

Competing against Aldi, Sam’s Club, Costco may require further price cuts, says Professor Luther.

“I’m not sure they’ve gotten down to low price,” she says.

But shoppers hope this latest price reduction is for real.

“I think that’s really helpful. I think that will be good for us,” says Bella Pressley of Ross Township.