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Big Changes Possible For Pittsburgh Public Schools

By: David Highfield
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(Photo Credit: KDKA)

(Photo Credit: KDKA)

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PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – Big changes are being proposed to save money in the Pittsburgh Public School District.

Superintendent Linda Lane wants to close seven schools, which is estimated to save as much as $8 million a year.

Under the plan, both Pittsburgh Langley High School in Sheraden and Pittsburgh Oliver High School on the North Side would close.

Connie LaRosa lives up the street from Oliver High School and would like to see it stay open.

“My son went to school over there. He came out with high honors, and it’s been a good school. We don’t have any trouble on the street,” LaRosa said.

If the school board approves the plan, students who currently go to Langley would go to Brashear, and students from Oliver would move to Perry.

LeRoy Williams, who lives near Oliver High School, doesn’t think Oliver students and Perry students will get along.

“I believe that’s going to be a great big problem,” Williams said.

The Oliver High School building itself would not close. Instead, it would become a facility for special education students. Another building currently used for those students would then shut down.

Likewise, the Langley building would also continue to be used, only as a Pre-Kindergarten to 8th Grade facility.

In addition to Oliver and Langley, Pittsburgh Fort Pitt Pre-K to 5th Grade, Pittsburgh Murray K to 8th Grade, Pittsburgh Northview Pre-K to 8th Grade, Pittsburgh Schaeffer K to 8th Grade and Pittsburgh Stevens K to 8th Grade would also close.

Superintendent Lane knows it may not be popular.

“I can’t think of a situation where a community is ever happy when you’re making this kind of a proposal,” Lane said. “All I can hope for is that the community understands.”

There will be several meetings where the community can comment on this issue. The earliest the board could vote is Nov. 22.

The changes would not take effect until the end of the next school year and the district has already cut jobs to save money.

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