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Braddock Mayor Continuing To Marry Same-Sex Couples

(Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

(Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

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BRADDOCK (KDKA/AP) – A Pittsburgh-area mayor is finding himself in demand since agreeing to marry a same-sex couple last week, but today Governor Tom Corbett had something to say about that.

Braddock Mayor John Fetterman said he’s opened his home – a former car dealership he and his wife are renovating – to four same-sex couples and had been scheduled to marry a fifth Wednesday night.

The governor, on a trip to Washington County, was asked if Mayor Fetterman could face criminal charges.

“I have no thought about the criminal charges,” said Corbett. “I’ve not gone that far. We have filed a lawsuit in Montgomery County. I understand that these individuals that he may have married may have gotten their license from Montgomery County. We’re asking for an injunction against Montgomery County for the clerk there to follow the law. And the law in Pennsylvania is it’s between a man and a woman.

Fetterman and at least one other mayor in Centre County, have been performing the ceremonies since a clerk in Montgomery County began issuing dozens of marriage licenses to same-sex couples last month.

Elizabeth Pantalone and Holly Fromlak, of Pittsburgh, were married by Fetterman Monday night. Pantalone says they considered getting married in another state before, but didn’t want the marriage to be void in Pennsylvania – though the state remains one of 35 banning same-sex marriage, despite Fetterman’s actions.

On Aug. 5, Fetterman performed the first same-sex marriage in Allegheny County.

John Kandray and Bill Gray, of Regent Square, said, have been together for 11 years and finally got to say, “I do.”

The couple knows that neither Pennsylvania nor the federal government may recognize their marriage, but they say one day they hope it will be recognized by both.

Corbett said, “Until such time as the Pennsylvania Supreme Court or the legislature changes their mind on that, that’s the law and we think that elected officials can’t pick and choose which laws that they want to follow and which laws they don’t want to follow.”

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(TM and © Copyright 2013 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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