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GM Adds 842,000 Vehicles To Ignition Switch Recall, Fix Not Available Till April

(Photo Credit: Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)

(Photo Credit: Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)

John Shumway John Shumway
John Shumway joined NewsRadio 1020 KDKA in 2004 as co-host of The KDKA...
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DETROIT (AP/KDKA) – The U.S. government’s auto safety watchdog likely is looking into whether General Motors was slow to report problems that led to 13 deaths and a massive recall of small cars.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has the authority to fine the company at least $35 million for not being forthcoming with information.

KDKA’s Ralph Iannotti Reports:

GM on Tuesday doubled to 1.6 million the number of small cars being recalled to fix faulty ignition switches linked to multiple fatal crashes. The company also issued a rare apology, saying its process to examine the problem was not robust enough.

The safety agency said in a statement Tuesday that it is reviewing GM documents and has questions about when GM found the ignition defect and when it notified regulators. Documents filed by GM show it knew of the problem as early as 2004.

“NHTSA will monitor consumer outreach as the recall process continues and will take appropriate action as warranted,” the statement said. A spokesman wouldn’t say what action is being considered or comment further.

Since undergoing a painful bankruptcy in 2009, GM has removed layers of bureaucracy, improved the quality of its vehicles and is quicker to issue recalls when problems occur. However, its admission that its processes were lacking 10 years ago shows how the old culture can still haunt the automaker.

“The chronology shows that the process employed to examine this phenomenon was not as robust as it should have been,” GM North America President Alan Batey said in a statement. “Today’s GM is committed to doing business differently and better.”

On Feb. 13, GM announced the recall of more than 780,000 Chevrolet Cobalts and Pontiac G5s (model years 2005-2007). Then on Tuesday, it doubled up, adding 842,000 Saturn Ion compacts (2003-2007), and Chevrolet HHR SUVs, Pontiac Solstice and Saturn Sky sports cars (2006-2007). Most of the cars were sold in the U.S., Mexico and Canada.

KDKA’s John Shumway Reports:

GM says a heavy key ring or jarring from rough roads can cause the ignition switch to move out of the run position and shut off the engine and electrical power. That can knock out power-assisted brakes and steering and disable the front air bags. The problem has been linked to 31 crashes and 13 front-seat deaths. In the fatalities, the air bags did not inflate, but the engines did not shut off in all cases, GM said.

It was unclear whether the ignition switches caused the crashes, or whether people died because the air bags didn’t inflate.

According to a chronology of events that GM filed Monday with NHTSA, the company knew of the problem as early as 2004, and was told of at least one fatal crash in March of 2007. GM issued service bulletins in 2005 and 2006 telling dealers how to fix the problem with a key insert, and advising them to warn customers about overloading their key chains. The company’s records showed that only 474 vehicle owners got the key inserts.

GM thought the service bulletin was sufficient because the car’s steering and brakes were operable even after the engines lost power, according to the chronology.

By the end of 2007, GM knew of 10 cases in which Cobalts were in front-end crashes where the air bags didn’t inflate, the chronology said.

GM’s chronology also shows that NHTSA knew about the problem and a fatal accident in March of 2007. NHTSA’s statement did not address why GM was allowed to wait so long to start a recall.

In 2005, GM initially approved an engineer’s plan to redesign the ignition switch, but the change was “later canceled,” according to the chronology.

GM spokesman Alan Adler said that initially the rate of problems per 1,000 vehicles was too low to warrant a recall. But he said safety information was kept in different places in the company 10 years ago.

Adler tells KDKA that owners of the cars will receive a letter from GM being sent first class on the March the 10th and March the 12th informing them they are involved in the recall.

However he says the parts will not be available in the dealerships for the repairs until after the first of April.

At that time owners will receive another letter from GM which they will then use to schedule their appointment to get the repairs made.

Until then Adler says if you’re driving one of the recalled vehicles, you should only use the vehicles key with nothing hanging on it.

Visit the General Motors website at this link for more information on the recall.

RELATED LINKS:
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