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Does It Really Do That? Veggetti

(Photo Credit: KDKA)

(Photo Credit: KDKA)

(Source: KDKA-TV) Jennifer Antkowiak
Jennifer Antkowiak returned to KDKA in September 2009 to co-anchor the...
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PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – If you’re watching carbs and calories, but love your pasta, a product called the Veggetti says it can help.

It’s a hand-held circular grater that’s supposed to make great tasting vegetable pasta.

Does it really do that?

KDKA-TV news anchor/Does It Really Do That? reporter Jennifer Antkowiak went back to some of your favorite testers to find out.

Lynn Berkoben and her aunt, Linda Onderick, helped us test the Stone Wave Cooker, and ended up loving it.

“We [want to] marry it,” they told Jen.

They had seen the ads for the Veggetti, but weren’t so sure about it.

“I love pasta, so I can’t wait to try this,” Linda said. “Doesn’t seem natural though, to have zucchini instead of pasta.”

Despite those uneasy feelings, Lynn and Linda were excited to try the veggie pasta because of the nutritional information on the packaging comparing regular pasta to zucchini pasta.

It shows 800 calories for a plate of regular pasta, 60 for a plate of Vegetti vegetable pasta; and from 160 grams of carbs to just eight grams.

The Veggetti is a plastic and metal grater with a removable safety holder.

It’s small, light-weight, needs no batteries – nothing to plug in. Different blades allow you to choose thin or thick cuts. It comes with an instruction and recipe booklet. The instructions warn about the sharp blades, and making sure to use the product with care.

Lynn wants to try making thin vegetable noodles first. So, as directed, she holds the metal handles to keep the Veggetti steady, inserts a zucchini and twists.

In seconds, out came spaghetti-like strands of zucchini.

“There it goes! Oh, look at that,” Linda says.

The directions tell you to cut the strands in half while they’re in the bowl to make it more manageable.

Lynn and Linda didn’t do that, but found out why they should. As Lynn kept twisting, the strands stayed very long.

When she got down to the end of the vegetable, the directions warn you not to put your fingers in the Veggetti, but to use the safety holder to safely use the rest of the vegetable.

Lynn tried it again with the thick grating blade, and it worked well there, too, twisting out mounds of wider veggie ribbons.

The recipe booklet says you can eat the veggie spaghetti raw in salads, microwave, sauté, or boil it.

Linda microwaved it with a little olive oil and garlic in her Stone Wave Cooker.

In just one minute, it was cooked, and, the ladies loved it.

“It’s good. We know this isn’t a taste test, but it’s really good,” they said.

So, as unnatural as it seemed at first, Lynn and Linda told Jen they could see themselves eating veggie pasta instead of regular noodles from time-to-time.

The Veggetti promises delicious veggie spaghetti without the carbs. So, does it really do that?

Our testers gave it two thumbs up.

“We’re [going to] marry this one, too!”

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